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Interview with Lana Del Rey for Clash Magazine

“‘A friend gave this [Pulp Art Book] to me as a present, but for some reason they thought the photographer was dead,’ explains Lana.

Krug’s work is bold, and comes across like that of a spaghetti Western surrealist with an eye for finding the artistic merit in ’70s American schlock. This book in particular is a collection of sublime moments captured through ancient Polaroids, which portray kaleidoscopic acid fantasies, B-movie sexploitation/violence, and Middle American subculture.

‘I was so heavily influenced by it, always thinking he was dead,’ says Lana.

Fortunately, the information was duff: Neil wasn’t dead. He was alive, well, and managing both very nearby in Los Angeles. It didn’t take too long for the pair to hook up some long-term plans, and his visual impact on 'Ultraviolence' has been prominent.

‘For some reason, he has been really life changing for me,” admits Lana. “He loves painting Polaroids and making little 8x10s. I saw one of the shots he took of me, and I felt it had to be the album cover. That photo influenced me to change the track listing.’”

— text by Joe Zadeh

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